Category Archives: 3D Touch printer

3d-Touch Dual-Head Printer [SOLD]

3D Touch Dual Head Printer for Sale in SF Bay

[The Printer is sold!]

As announced in a previous post, since I received my Form1 Printer I cannot really justify keeping my 3DTouch printer. It’s a shame as STL printers and FDM printers are complementary. I will miss the various colors and material available and the fact that the parts are ready to be used after print. No rinsing bath / UV curing needed like the Form1 🙂

What you will get is the full package with everything to print and a lot’s of filament (~22kg / ~$900 of filament). I would rather do a local sell (I’m south SF Bay) than prepare a shipment, it’s heavy! If you come to pick-up, I’ll give you a training session of an hour to learn how to prepare your model with Kisslicer, load the filament and print.

I’ll publish this on Craig’s list in a few days, so my blog readers have some early notice!

Content of the package

  • 3D-Touch Dual Heads printer lightly used (I’ve probably printed less than 4 kg of filament since April)
  • 18 New/unopened Bits From Bits 1Kg 3mm spools (various colors, PLA and ABS, see details under)
  • 7 used spools (with at least 4kg of plastic remaining of various colors)
  • All accessories: clamps, cutters, USB key to load models, Small diameter spools adapter…
  • Consumables: 2 inches blue tape roll, Acetone (only if pickup, I’m not sending it)
  • You can get the sturdy metal cabinet under for $180 (from Lowe’s store, only if pickup, I’m not sending it), it’s pretty handy to store everything.

3DTouch_printer_and_cabinet

PLA Spools Included

Note: on open spools the remaining weight are only evaluation, I’ve been conservative so you’ll get more filament! I kept my PLA spools on plastic bags after opening.

  • New Unopened 1kg / 3mm PLA spools from Bits From Bytes (protected in plastic with desiccant):1 Black, 3 Natural Clear, 2 White, 1 Red, 1 Blue
  • Open spools 3mm from Bits From Bytes:
    Black 200g remaining, Purple 800g remaining, Green 500g Remaining
  • Open spools 3mm Matter Hackers:
    Orange 300g remaining, Red 400g remaining

PLA_spools

ABS Spools Included

  • New Unopened 1kg / 3mm ABS spools from Bits From Bytes : 2 Black, 3 White, 2 Green, 2 Blue, 1 Yellow
  • Open spools 3mm from Bits From Bytes:
    Yellow 900g remaining, Black 900g Remaining

ABS_spools

Send me your offer at: damien[dot]job[at]gmail[dot]com

For a friend wedding this was my last print, mustache for everyone and bow-tie for the groom! The 3D touch is sturdy and super reliable printer!

Moustache_BowTie

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Giant 3D Printed dice!

Two weeks ago I helped my friend Tristan Convert present his crazy shape dice game called Dice Age at the Kubla-Con. This is a big board gaming convention in the bay area and we had the honor to be located in the lobby where everyone was passing. Explaining the rules tens of time loudly to cover the back noise was demanding on our voice but the experience was interesting.

RealSizeDice

Dice age is a fast pace (10~15 minutes), two player game were both player are using strange shape dice that represent fighters and effects to destroy the opponent castle. Tristan is currently molding and painting each dice by hand which is a herculean task. Participating at the convention was the best way to validate that the current set of rules was working and ready for the prime time. The short term goal is to find an industrialization solution to use plastic injection and mass produce the final product. While the game is interesting in its current form, we needed something to attract people eyes. So two weeks before the convention we decided to print a giant 300% set of these dice for the show.

3scales_theorem

You can see in the previous picture the real size dice, hand molded by Tristan and with the magic of 3D printer the giant versions of the same dice. The middle one was an error of “casting” as I made a mistake in the scale and got 200% instead of 300%…

green_with_support

Each of these dice was about 15cm side and took 8 to 12 hours to print on the 3D touch. I had to experiment to figure out what printing angle was the best to get supports that could get cleaned easily. My process was to use the free version of Nettfab to scale and rotate properly the original STL, then using Kisslicer for the slicing/supports/G-code generation.

GreenCleaned

In most of the case the supports are relatively easy to remove, provided you avoid large horizontal surfaces that needs to be supported. In this case a knife and patience are the only way to get rid of the support and the final surface finish is not really clean.

OrangeYellowRedLarge GreenDiceLarge

After a marathon print session were the printer was working 24/7 for more than a week and hand painting using standard acrylic paint, the result was a stunning set of 12 giant dice that did the show for us and attracted many players and photographs.

GlobalView

Next step is to use these printed dice as master to cast a foam version of the giant set 🙂

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Impossible Dovetail Joint

For this week Impossible object, we will revisit the dovetail joints and have a look at some interesting variation on the theme. This time we will use the “master sketch” technique in Inventor to build our different pieces.

 

This technique is using a single part with all the sketches required to model the whole assembly. Each piece is then derived from the master. To update the model, you just have to update the master sketch, and if everything is properly built, your whole assembly should follow.

Result_picture1

The inventor result files links are at the end, with the STL and the thingiverse link.

  • To start, create a part with a bunch of user parameters to control the design. Then on the horizontal plan XY create a sketch with the outline of the 2 main blocks (length*width).
    impossibleDovetail_01_userParam
  • The dovetails are extruded on a non-vertical plan, so the easiest way to control the result is to create a sketch in XZ plan and draw a segment with ‘Tilt’ angle from the horizontal. Then use this segment and the origin point to create the work plane using “Normal to axis through Point” tool.
    impossibleDovetail_02_TiltPlan
  • The next sketch will be on this newly created plan. The left triangle and the left side of the center one are drawn and the rest is a mirror copy. The base of the left triangle is at length/5=10mm. To allow some clearance in the pieces, all triangle have been “offset” inside by “clearance” parameter (0.25mm here).
    impossibleDovetail_03_DovetailSketch
  • The final master sketch part should now look like the view under.
    impossibleDovetail_04_Mastersketch
  • Now we create a new part to model the first piece. From the manage tab, select the “Derive” tool and choose the master sketch part. Then make sure that the User parameters and the Sketches are shared (yellow plus) and validate. The master sketches will appear in you new part. Now any change in the master sketch will update the part (you will have to press the update button / thunder bolt)
    impossibleDovetail_05_Derive
  • Each sketch will be used multiple time to build the piece, so don;t forget to make them “visible” again once they have been used by an operation. The first thing will be to create the “male” dovetail in the center, so the first step is to extrude the small version of the center triangle by a very large amount on both side.
    impossibleDovetail_06_Centerdovetail
    Then extrude the left rectangle by height and keep only the intersection. to create the dove tail.
    impossibleDovetail_07_CenterdovetailFinished
    impossibleDovetail_08_CenterdovetailFinished2
  • Now the main body can be created by Extruding the right rectangle by “height”.
    impossibleDovetail_09_body
    To create the 2 side female dovetails, just select both the external rim and the internal triangle on both side and cut into the main piece.
    impossibleDovetail_10_body
  • To finish the piece you can add a fillet on the internal side of the dovetail.
    impossibleDovetail_11_finish
  • The second piece is created the same way, from a derived part except you have to do the “negative” geometry.
    impossibleDovetail_12_PieceB

And here is the result assembled with a “wood” finish 🙂

impossibleDovetail_Result01

impossibleDovetail_Result02

I’ve printed the result to check that the piece would indeed fit and yes it works!

The STL files are available in Thingiverse here and the Inventor files are here.

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First prints & lessons learned

After many tests print I finally got to print some real stuff these last day. The first object was something completely useless but full of gears and very cool (so by my standard indispensable).

One of the mistake I made, was to print the raft and the pin out of PLA. I could not get them to stick to the bed without but couldn’t separate the result so my yellow internal pieces have a black layer 🙂 GearCube_Assembly

The end result is a nice transformer like cube…GearCube_EndResult

My second print was one of my puzzle: double dovetail with a twist.

The pieces are large and I got warping as my bed is not heated… Nevertheless, the comb infill is nice to see…DoveTail_warping

The dovetails ended pretty flat, and just a little bit of sanding was necessary to allow a nice sliding between the parts. DoveTail_separated

And here is the final assembly 🙂 I need to design more puzzle!DoveTail_assembled

And here is the puzzle in action!

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A new comer !

I’ve not posted for a few days now, because I was experimenting with my new printer. I came across this 3D touch printer from Bits from Bytes and it was the perfect tool to start experimenting on 3D printer while waiting for the Form1.

3dtouch_printer

It’s a Fused deposition modeling type that can print ABS and PLA plastics. Like any technology there is usually no silver bullet and these printer are quite complementary to stereolithographic ones:

FDM pros:

  • Wild variety of printable materials, with different colors and mechanical properties. The main ones are PLA and ABS. PLA is a recyclable plastic made  from corn than can be dissolved in hot water over the course of multiple days. ABS is stiffer and better for mechanical pieces but not as ‘green’. But you can find also ‘wood’ filament, nylon or even recently an elastic/flexible filament has been announced. From the way the extruder head works in this printer I don’t think I will be able to print this elastic filament.
  • The printing materials are “cheap”, the starting price is around ~$30 for a spool of 1kg of PLA. Specialized materials/colors are of course more expensive but at least the basic material is affordable. There are also initiative to build/sell filament extuders so you can even recycle your own trash plastic. I would be worried about the fumes that some plastics are releasing while melting and wouldn’t try these apparatus with PVC for example (but maybe HCl is only created when the plastic is burned?)…
  • With FDM you can print hollow or partially filled objects. The internal structure will add structural strength while keeping the weight down. It’s also a great way to save maters and produce cheaper parts.
  • The printer can have multiple extruder heads, so an object can be made out of different colors/materials. It’s also possible to print supports in PLA and the main object in ABS, so once the print is finished, the support can be dissolved without affecting the object.

FDM cons:

  • The print accuracy & reliability can be difficult to reach. These printer are still not main stream and requires a lot of fiddling and tuning to get the best result. One of the main challenge is to have the first layers adhere to the print bed. If the temperature, calibration, surface state is not perfect the print will not work. Once the adhesion is working, the surface quality, over-hang and seams marks are some of the few challenges that needs to be cleared…

Stereolithography pro:

  • The laser curing enable high accuracy and reliability
  • The printer can have fewer moving parts, so it’s easier to calibrate/operate

Stereolithography cons:

  • Cost of the resins, even with the Kickstarter preferential cost, the liter of resin has been announced at ~$120. The materials are also usually not really nice and a bit toxic when uncured. The choice of resins are also more limited in color and mechanical properties.
  • With the ‘vat of resin’ design, it’s difficult to build an hollow object, unless there is an escape hole to flush the resin at the end. This will translate in higher cost of the final parts.

But enough talk, let’s have a look to my first prints 🙂 I’ve spend quite some time calibrating the bed to make sure it was horizontal to the head axis. The first print was one of the example given by BFB in ABS. While the layers were quite coarse, the end result is quite impressive, very sturdy and light.duckyPrint

For the second try I’ve selected the one piece Penrose triangle that I’ve put on Thingiverse.

onePiecePenroseTriangle_withSupportThe support was a bit difficult to remove (I might try to get it less dense next time), the final shape is a bit too curvy, but with the right angle the illusion is nearly working.

penrose_final

penrose_final_side

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